Neapolitan pizza dough.

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Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 9:53 am

Video Here...
Pizza Dough Ingredients:
2.2 lb. “00” flour
20 oz. water
1 oz. salt
1 g. fresh yeast

Making the dough:
Melt yeast into 1/2 of the water and pour into the mixer. Add flour into the mixer and begin mixing on slowest speed. Add the salt to the remaining water, then pour into the mixer. Mix for 15 minutes on slowest speed. Place the dough on the counter, wrap it with plastic and let it stand for 40 minutes. Cut into dough balls and let rest for 4 hours. (This resting period is essential to retard the formation of gluten, resulting in the chewy, puffed texture that is the signature of Neapolitan pizza.) Place into cooler for use the next day.

Stretching the dough:
Working with one dough ball at a time, dust heavily with semolina. Using your fingertips, press dough from the center out into a 10” circle, about ¼” thick and leaving a 1” thick crust around the edges. Hold dough straight up, and, with fingertips circling crust, let dough naturally fall. Slide your fingers around crust in a circular motion as you would turn a steering wheel until dough in the center is stretched to about ⅛” thick; transfer to a semolina-dusted pizza peel.


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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:34 am

Big Dave's Old Faithful Dough Formula

Category:

Pizza Dough

Recipe Source:

Chef Submissions

Submitted By:

Big Dave Ostrander

Description:

Ingredients:

  • 46 lbs. 100% High Gluten Flour (12% - 13% Protein)
  • 7 oz. (1.0%) Salt
  • 9 oz. (1.2%) Sugar


 

  • 1.0 oz. (0.2%)Yeast (Instant Dry)
  • 16 oz. (2.2%) Vegetable Oil
  • 23.7 lbs. (51.6%) Water (75F)

Directions:
1. Accurately weigh out all ingredients.
2. Pour water & sugar, salt in 60 qt. mixing bowl. Stir with wire whip. Let rest to dissolve and stir again.
3. Pour in veg. oil and stir again.
4. Pour in flour.
5. Sprinkle Instant yeast on top of flour.
6. Start mixer on low speed and mix for 10 minutes.

When dough has finished mixing place on worktable. Core temperature of dough should be close to 80F. Cut dough balls to desired weights. Suggested weights:10=9oz. 12=12oz. 14=18oz. 16=22oz.
Roll dough pieces into seamless round ball shapes.
Place the dough balls on an oiled aluminum sheet pan.
Cover with a plastic bun pan bag and date with a magic marker. Place dough under refrigeration. 35-38F is ideal.

This formula is a low-yeast, next-day retarded formula. The dough needs to rest in the refrigerator for at least 24 hours before using. Two day proofing is better. Then the dough will have great flavor. The useful shelf life of the dough before it over raises and starts to blow, is 3 days, not counting day one.
To soften the dough and reduce elasticity one may add 8 oz. of PZ-44 dough conditioner to the batch when you add the yeast. This natural reducer eliminates the snap back tendencies of dough made from Hi-Gluten flour and makes the dough more user friendly for operations that don't have experience in hand tossing and spinning.

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:38 am

New York Style Pizza Dough

Category:

Pizza Dough

Recipe Source:

Chef Submissions

Submitted By:

Tom Lehmann, The Dough Doctor

Description:


  • This formula produces a somewhat thin crust with a tough, chewy texture.


Ingredients:

  • Flour: (a typical pizza flour with 13.5 to 14% or more protein): 100.00%
  • Salt 1.75%


  • Olive Oil: 1.00%
  • Compressed Yeast: 0.5 to 0.75%
  • Water (with the temperature adjusted to give a finished dough at 80 to 85F): 58 to 65%

Directions:
Standard Dough Making Procedure: Put water into the mixing bowl, add the salt and sugar, then add the flour and the yeast. Mix at low speed for about 2 minutes, then mix at medium speed until all of the flour has been picked up into the dough. Now add the oil and mix in for 2 minutes at low speed, then mix the dough at medium speed until it develops a smooth, satiny appearance (generally about 8 to 10 minutes using a planetary mixer).

The dough temperature should be between 80 and 85F. Immediately divide the dough into desired weight pieces and round into balls. Wipe the dough balls with salad oil, and place into plastic dough boxes. Make sure that the dough balls are spaced about 2 inches apart. Cross stack the uncovered dough boxes in the cooler for 2 hours as this will allow the dough balls to cool down thoroughly, and uniformly. The dough boxes can then be nested, with the top box being covered. This will prevent excessive drying of the dough balls.
The dough balls will be ready to use after about 12 hours of refrigeration. They can be used after up to 72 hours of refrigeration with good results. To use the dough balls, remove a quantity from the cooler and allow them to warm at room temperature for approximately 2-3 hours. The dough can then be shaped into skins, or shaped into pans for proofing. Unused dough can remain at room temperature (covered to prevent drying) for up to 6 hours after removal from the cooler.
Note: If using ACTIVE DRY YEAST (ADY) only half the amo0unt as compressed yeast. Then suspend the ADY in a small quantity of warm water (105 110F) and allow it to stand for 10 to 15 minutes. Add this to the water in the mixing bowl, but do not add the salt and sugar to the water, instead, add the salt and sugar to the flour, then begin mixing as directed.
If using INSTANT DRY YEAST (IDY) us only 1/3 the amount as compressed yeast. Add the IDY to the flour along with the salt and sugar, and begin mixing as directed.


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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:38 am

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:46 am


Traditional, American Style, Thin Crust Pizza Dough

Category:

Pizza Dough

Recipe Source:

Chef Submissions

Submitted By:

Tom Lehmann, The Dough Doctor

Description:

Ingredients:

  • Flour(a strong bread type flour with 12 to 13% protein) 100.00%
  • Salt: 1.75%
  • Sugar: (optional) 2.00%


  • Compressed Yeast: 1.50%
  • Olive Oil/Vegetable Oil: 3.00%
  • Water (70 to 75F) 55 to 58.00%


Directions:

Standard Dough Making Procedure: Put water into the mixing bowl, add the salt and sugar, then add the flour and the yeast. Mix at low speed for about 2 minutes, then mix at medium speed until all of the flour has been picked up into the dough.
Now add the oil and mix in for 2 minutes at low speed, then mix the dough at medium speed until it develops a smooth, satiny appearance (generally about 8 to 10 minutes using a planetary mixer). The dough temperature should be between 80 and 85F.
Immediately divide the dough into desired weight pieces and round into balls. Wipe the dough balls with salad oil, and place into plastic dough boxes. Make sure that the dough balls are spaced about 2 inches apart.
Cross stack the uncovered dough boxes in the cooler for 2 hours as this will allow the dough balls to cool down thoroughly, and uniformly. The dough boxes can then be nested, with the top box being covered. This will prevent excessive drying of the dough balls.
The dough balls will be ready to use after about 12 hours of refrigeration. They can be used after up to 72 hours of refrigeration with good results. To use the dough balls, remove a quantity from the cooler and allow them to warm at room temperature for approximately 2-3 hours. The dough can then be shaped into skins, or shaped into pans for proofing. Unused dough can remain at room temperature (covered to prevent drying) for up to 6 hours after removal from the cooler.
Note: If using ACTIVE DRY YEAST (ADY) only half the amount as compressed yeast. Then suspend the ADY in a small quantity of warm water (105 - 110F) and allow it to stand for 10 to 15 minutes. Add this to the water in the mixing bowl, but do not add the salt and sugar to the water, instead, add the salt and sugar to the flour, then begin mixing as directed.If using INSTANT DRY YEAST (IDY) us only 1/3 the amount as compressed yeast. Add the IDY to the flour along with the salt and sugar, and begin mixing as directed.


http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/Traditional-American-Style-Thin-Crust-Pizza-Dough
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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:56 am

The Best New York Style Pizza Dough

This recipe make four 14" pizzas or can be halved to make two 14-inch pizzas

 Cook Time 6 minutes
 Total Time 6 minutes

 Author Marie B, Feeling Foodish

Ingredients


  • Flour , all purpose or bread, 28 oz (796 grams) (6.5 cups of King Arthur Brand or 6 cups of Gold Medal brand; see note)
  • Water , 17.4 oz (493 grams or mls) (cool to room temp) (a little less than 2 1/4 cups)
  • Instant dry yeast , 1 teaspoon (3.5 grams)
  • Salt , 2.5 teaspoons (15.6 grams)
  • Sugar , 2 teaspoons (7.8 grams) (optional)
  • Olive oil , 3 teaspoons (11.8 ml)


Instructions

[list=wprm-recipe-instructions]
[*]Place water in mixing bowl.
[*]In a separate bowl, mix salt and yeast (and sugar if using) into flour
[*]Combine flour/salt/yeast mixture into water and mix until all the flour has been incorporated.
[*]After flour has been totally incorporated, add oil and knead for about 4 to 5 minutes (see note)
[*]Test final dough temperature, which should ideally be between high 70s to low 80s (optional)
[*]Divide dough into 4 equal pieces (using a digital scale if possible; each ball should weigh 11.5 oz [~326 grams]) and place in greased, sealed quart-sized container or oiled/greased freezer bag and refrigerate overnight or up to 72 hours (After much experimenting, I have concluded that I like 3 days best but day 2 is good too).
[*]The following day, remove your dough balls within 1 hour or less of baking and allow the dough to come to room temperature. (the dough will tend to blister more if the dough has not been allowed to come to room temperature however, I often bake coldish dough without problems, just some bubbling)
[*]In the meantime, place your pizza stone in oven and preheat at 550 degrees (depending on thickness of your stone and your oven's power) for at least 1 hour
[*]Open each dough ball using care not to degas, transfer to a pre-floured pizza peel (or on parchment paper), and top with your favorite sauce, cheese, or other toppings.
[*]Transfer pizza from peel to oven or slide parchment paper onto preheated pizza pan/stone and bake for 4 to 6 minutes each until browned on top and cheese has melted but not burned.
[*]Enjoy!
[/list]

Recipe Notes

Weighing the flour is *highly* recommended. Using a cup to measure will typically yield inaccurate results, plus different flour brands have different weights If you want to use the dough the next day, knead a little more (slow speed for about 8 to 10 minutes) or if you have time to let the dough rest for 3 days, knead for 4 to 5 minutes, low speed or hand knead.

Baker's percents: 62% hydration, 0.4% yeast, 1.5% salt, 1.5% oil, and 1% sugar with a thickness factor of 0.08 using this calculator: http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough-calculator.html


http://feelingfoodish.com/the-best-new-york-style-pizza-dough/
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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 12:02 pm

Ingredients




  • 20 ounces (about 4 cups) bread flour, preferably Italian-style "OO"
  • .4 ounces kosher salt (about 4 teaspoons)
  • .3 ounces (about 2 teaspoons) instant yeast
  • 13 ounces water



Directions



[list="recipe-procedures-list instructions"]
[*]1.
Combine flour, salt, and yeast in a large bowl and whisk until homogenous. Add water and incorporate into flour using hands until no dry flour remains on bottom of bowl. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise at room temperature for 8 to 12 hours.
[*]2.
Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface and divide into four even balls. Place each in a covered quart-sized deli container or in a zipper-lock freezer bag. Place in refrigerator and allow to rise at least 2 more days, and up to 4. Remove from refrigerator, shape into balls, and allow to rest at room temperature for at least 2 hours before baking.
[/list]
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/07/basic-neapolitan-pizza-dough-recipe.html
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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough.

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 16, 2017 12:05 pm

Directions

[list="recipe-procedures-list instructions"]
[*]1.
Combine flour, salt, and yeast in a large bowl and whisk until homogenous. Add water and incorporate into flour using hands until no dry flour remains on bottom of bowl. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise at room temperature for 8 to 12 hours.
[*]2.
Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface and divide into four even balls. Place each in a covered quart-sized deli container or in a zipper-lock freezer bag. Place in refrigerator and allow to rise at least 2 more days, and up to 4. Remove from refrigerator, shape into balls, and allow to rest at room temperature for at least 2 hours before baking.
[/list]
[size]
[size=30]This Recipe Appears In[/size]
The Food Lab: 11 Essential Tips for Better PizzaThe Pizza Lab: Three Doughs to Know[/size]


J. KENJI LÓPEZ-ALT CHIEF CULINARY ADVISOR

[size]
J. Kenji López-Alt is the Chief Culinary Advisor of Serious Eats, and author of the James Beard Award-nominated column The Food Lab, where he unravels the science of home cooking. A restaurant-trained chef and former Editor at Cook's Illustrated magazine, his first book, The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science is a New York Times Best-Seller, the recipient of a James Beard Award, and was named Cookbook of the Year in 2015 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals.
He's currently raising a daughter by day and writing his second book, The Food Lab Vol. II by night. (Now with 10% more science!). It will be released in late 2018 (the book, not the daughter).
Order your copy of The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science today![/size]

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Filed Under

  • dough
     
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I believe that 4 teaspoons of salt in this recipe is incorrect. 
.4 oz = 11.34 g, which would be about 2 teaspoons of kosher salt...not 4



it would be nice if someone addressed this. 

is it 4 teaspoons kosher salt or .4 oz ( 2 teaspoons)?

anyone out there at SE?



Hey - sorry, yes, it's .4 ounces, which if you are measuring diamond crystal kosher salt (my kosher salt of choice), is about 4 teaspoons. With Morton's, it's about 3 teaspoons, and with regular table salt, it's about 2 teaspoons. Diamond crystal kosher salt, because of its larger grain size, is less dense than table salt. So the volumetric measures are correct, assuming you're using Diamond Crystal. For the most accurate results, however, you should weigh everything!



do you have a tutorial on how to ball up the dough after the bulk rise? when I divide up the dough into quartters, each "ball"is almost football shaped, and getting it back in a ball is tough... I end up kneeding it a little which prob isnt good. I think that an intermediate/advanced tutorial on dough stretching and shaping would be really helpful in general.



When one of the four balls of dough is stretched out, how large will it be in diameter (i.e. what size pizza does this dough make)?



Dear Professor Pizza,
even being a few thousand miles away in Germany your blog is still being read and followed Very Happy. Just like you i took for the last 7 years or so a serious and even scientific approach to the holy grail(s) of pizza dough... Your recipe is quite good but just like my tries and trying on anhanceable... Sometimes i find it quite hilarious reading american recipies mentioning that packed seasoning, that particular sauce or another spice mixture... Let's be serious... every italian mama would have bashed you guys already... With no offense of course Wink... First of all, what i found out living on both of our continents.. Big differnce in the water grade... if my typing is correct... Our water over here is first of all much cleaner. Every drip out of the tap is usable and drinkable... Which leads to the first problem... Instead of using water from the tap, valve?? try using still mineral water for 3/4 of the amount to put in the dough... last 1/4 use mineral water with gas? qua minerale frizzante.. with carbon dioxide... it helps th dough to rise also quite a bit.. instead of using dry yeast.. use fresh one... i buy qubes in 42 gram portions... its of course more potent so i use half of the 42 grams... Go ask google to convert... The reason is... using dried yeast you actually don't know how much of the bacteria even if its a small amount is already dead by granulating and drying out. Fresh is anyhow always a better approach. Original italian recipes also refer always to use extra virgine olive oil with at least 2 table spoons directly into the dough incorperated. I found out that it doesn't make a difference if its either incorperated into the dough or put on the surface while fermenting for the first 12 hours to prevent drying out. So here is my final recipe for the ultimate dough.. I don't have an italian background but when it comes down to pizza & pasta i am an italianator...

1000 grams 00 flour
550 ml of water 450 ml without carbon hydrate 100 with 
21 grams of fresh yeast
2 table spoons of regular salt... just like you mentioned it differs from the size of the corns.

Put the hole flour on the table. Build a hole in the middle, crumble in the yeast, use luke warm water... Just a pinch of sugar into it to get the yeast going... kneed it a few minutes, not all the way through and let it rest for at least 12 hours maybe even 18... From there on th process is absolutly the same as yours.. With 18 hours the dough is more firm and dense and still bubbleing... Yeast isn't happy with sitting in a fridge at all .. as you know.. so 18 should be good.. never tried 24 h before... without putting it in the fridge.. While letting the dough still rise outside of the fridge... cope it wih olive oil... which should be incorperated during the kneeding process to give it a final twist.. When the dough has fermented for at least 3 to 4 days... a few hours before making the pizzas cut 2 garlic gloves in small pieces... cope with olive oil and apinch of salt. Finish the pizza when its on the verge of put in the oven with a brushing the garlic oil on the edge all around... Hope that helped for some advice getting the perfect restaurant like pizza going a little more to the extreme Very Happy... Excuse the typos and misspellings please... Great blog anyways... Marcel



maybe you ca delete the first comment please.. here is the corrected one Very Happy

Dear Professor Pizza,
even being a few thousand miles away in Germany your blog is still being read and followed Very Happy. Just like you i took for the last 7 years or so a serious and even scientific approach to the holy grail(s) of pizza dough making... Your recipe is quite good but just like my tries and trying on anhanceable... Sometimes i find it quite hilarious reading american recipies mentioning, that packed seasoning, that particular sauce or another spice mixture to use ... Let's be serious... every italian mama would have bashed you guys already... With no offense of course Wink... First of all, what i found out living on both of our continents.. Big differnce in the water grade... if my typing is correct... Our water over here is first of all much cleaner. Every drip out of the tap is usable and drinkable... Which leads to the first difference... Instead of using water from the tap, valve?? try using still mineral water for 3/4 of the amount to put in the dough... last 1/4 use mineral water with gas? aqua minerale frizzante.. with carbon dioxide... it helps the dough to rise also quite a bit more.. instead of using dry yeast.. use a fresh one... i buy qubes in 42 gram portions... its of course more potent so i use half of the 42 grams... Go ask google to convert... The reason is... using dried yeast you actually don't know how much of the bacteria even if its a small amount is already dead by granulating and drying out. Fresh is anyhow a better approach. Original italian recipes also refer always to use extra virgine olive oil with at least 2 table spoons directly into the dough incorperated. I found out that it doesn't make a difference if its either incorperated into the dough or put on the surface while fermenting for the first 12-XX hours to prevent drying out. So here is my final recipe for the ultimate dough.. I don't have an italian background but when it comes down to pizza & pasta i am an italianator...

1000 grams 00 flour
550 ml of water 450 ml without carbon hydrate 100 with
21 grams of fresh yeast
2 table spoons of regular salt... just like you mentioned it differs from the size of the corns.

Put the whole amount of flour on the table or the kneading machine. Build a hole in the middle, crumble in the yeast, use luke warm water out of the bottle or the tap... Just a pinch of sugar into it to get the yeast going... Leave it to rest for 10 minutes until the yeast, sugar water mix forms a "muschroom like "dome".knead it, not all the way through just a little and let it rest for at least 12 hours maybe even 18... From there on the process is absolutly the same as yours.. With 18 hours the dough is more firm and dense and still bubbleing... Yeast isn't happy with sitting in a fridge at all .. as you know.. so 18 should be good.. never tried 24 h before... without putting it in the fridge.. While letting the dough still rise outside of the fridge... cope it with olive oil... which should be incorperated during the kneading process at the end to give it a final twist.. When the dough has fermented for at least 3 to 4 days... a few hours before making the pizzas cut 2 garlic gloves in small pieces... cope with olive oil and a pinch of salt. Finish the pizza when its on the verge of being put in the oven with a brushing of the garlic/salt oil mixture on the edge all around... Hope that helped for some advice getting the perfect restaurant like pizza going a little more to the extreme Very Happy... Excuse the typos and misspellings please... Great blog anyways... Marcel



I too, am an avid reader of your blog. Being Danish and thus accustomed to the metric scale, I have noticed that you in other recipes have used metric scale. I urge you to do so consistently - or at least alternatively. It may also alleviate confusion such as the above. I am a great admirer of Reinhardt and his bakers formula approach and will leave you with my favorite dough recipe of his: (works for pizza, foccaie, breads...) g=grams

1000 g. flour
650 g, ice cold water
25 g. salt
10 g. fresh bakers yeast

Knead for 8-10 min. Transfer to oiled bowl, covered in film. Refrigerate 12-24 hours. Divide and proof at room temp. 1-2 hours. Bake at absolute max. temp. For large loaves add steam and reduce heat accordingly.

Keep kneading...!



I really encourage using a digital scale. I just bought a new one for 15 dollars. It handles up to 5 kg. and does both lb. and kg. at the 'flick of a switch''. Not only is a digital scale a cheap and brilliant tool - it is also a great mediator for trans Atlantic culinary dialogue!


Alessio Sangalli3:18PM on 04/12/13

I also urge @Kenji to use grams (on a digital scale). Make the world a better place. Please.



Speaking of "serious", your Neapolitan pizza dough recipe is seriously fucked up. After "cold rising" four days in my refrigerator, this gloppy pile of crap your recipe specified was inflexible, recalcitrant, and totally ready to tear at a touch. The whole mess went directly into my garbage can, leaving me with a lot of sauce and cheese with which, tomorrow, I will make a nice pasta casserole, Last time I ever look at your website. Thanks a lot.


Alessio Sangalli10:33PM on 07/02/13

doghair - I think you must have made a mistake because it works for me very well, and then I get very good results with the broiler skillet method. Probably you need to learn!



@doghair

This recipe is about as classic as a Neapolitan dough recipe gets. 100% flour, 65% hydration, plus salt and yeast. That's what a traditional Neapolitan dough calls for, and that's what we've got here. Perhaps you are unused to working with very high hydration doughs? If you didn't let th dough rest at room temperature properly, then it will also be difficult to stretch.



Kenji - Can this be done using rapid rise yeast? And would King Arthurs Bread flour work? Is bread flour interchangeable w/ 00 flour?


@fwilger

You can use rapidrise!

And yes, you can use King Arthurs, though the texture will be a little different. You'll need to add perhaps 1 to 2% more water.




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