The Coolerdor

View previous topic View next topic Go down

The Coolerdor

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 03, 2011 10:07 pm

TinyArticle - Free Articles | Article Directory | Coolidor – the Cheap Alternative to a Cigar Humidor

Coolidor – the Cheap Alternative to a Cigar Humidor



By: Walter Gibbs

The coolidor is becoming a very popular method of storing one’s cigars because the truth of the matter is that not all cigar enthusiasts can afford the expensive cigar humidors. Cigar humidors are expensive and a lot of enthusiasts are looking for ways to save up on a few bucks without sacrificing the quality of the cigar preservation. The internet offers do it yourself alternatives to cigar humidors, one of which is the coolidor.



The first item you would need in a coolidor is a cooler. The size of the cooler depends on the number of cigars you are planning to store. The size of cooler really doesn’t matter, the most important thing is that you choose a cooler that has a tight seal. An airtight seal ensures that the humidity inside your coolidor will be regulated.



The next item would need to build a coolidor is a device that can control the humidity within the coolidor. Any humidification device can be used to control the humidity. One of the more popular solutions to humidity is humidification beads. There are a lot of stores on the internet that are selling these beads. If you are considering these beads, you must keep in mind that they maintain 65 70 humidity in the cooler. To keep the beads at a good level, use only distilled water. The beads are clear when the humidity level are high, if they turn white it means that it is time to you refill it with distilled water. Humidification beads are a cheap and easy way to regulate humidity.



Although humidification beads offer you a way to measure the humidity in the coolidor, these are not enough. You need an accurate measuring device to know the exact level of humidity in your coolidor. This is why you need to buy a good hygrometer. You can buy a hygrometer for around $20.



Once you have these three items, you can now start seasoning your coolidor and, soon enough, storing your cigars. Cigar enthusiasts sometimes keep their lighters matches, cigar cutters and other cigar accessories in the coolidor with their cigars.



Cigar humidors use cedar wood to line the interiors because they absorb moisture well and, as an effect, regulate the humidity in the coolidor. By using cedar wood, you are ensured that excess moisture and humidity will be absorbed by the wood and will keep your cigars preserved. You can buy empty cigar boxes made of cedar wood from your local tobacco shop.



Once you have all your equipment, then it’s time to start preparing your coolidor. The first step is to clean your cooler. It is best that you avoid strong chemicals when cleaning the cooler as they may leave residue and smells that can leave an unwanted taste in the cigar. Once you have cleaned the cooler, then you can start placing your cigar boxes in the cooler. Remember to save a space where you can put a small dish that contains your humidification beads. Place the beads at two sides of the cooler to ensure that the moisture is evenly spread within the cooler. Check the humidity after two days and ensure that the hygrometer reading is at around 65 70 . The temperatures should preferably be under 70 or low 70s max.



Once you have ensured that the humidity levels in the cooler are regulated, you can now start storing your cigars in the boxes. By making your own coolidor you can save a lot of money from spending on expensive cigar humidors.




Author Resource:->  The author is a cigar enthusiast and has written extensive guides on the Coolidor, an inexpensive way to store cigars, and finding the best Golf Cigar Holder. See some of his latest guides at http://www.homemadehumidor.com and http://www.golfcigarholder.com

Article From TinyArticle - Free Articles | Article Directory
avatar
Admin
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 1445
Reputation : 0
Points : 6984
Registration date : 2008-08-31

http://swamp-ass.forumotion.net

Back to top Go down

Re: The Coolerdor

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 03, 2011 10:07 pm

Alternative Cigar Storage Methods
A humidor is NOT essential to cigar storage. In fact there are many inexpensive and effective means for maintaining and aging your cigars. Two of the most popular ones are "Tupperdors" and "Igloodors."

Tupperdor - A Tupperdor is nothing more than a plastic food container. You can use Tupperware or any other similar product. These are inexpensive and very effective. Simply add a humidifier and you are all set. Many people place those cedar separator sheets that come from boxes of cigars on the bottom of their tupperdors to introduce the element of Spanish cedar. Remember to store your tupperdors in a dark cool place.
An Igloodor is simply a large ice cooler like those made by the Igloo or Coleman companies. They come in a wide variety of sizes with the most common being a 48 qt. model, but I know many people that utilize the giant 128 qt. models. This is an ideal way to store full boxes of cigar very inexpensively. Some people line the interior by attaching Spanish cedar with a non-toxic scentfree adhesive and others even create dividers. You can make a large humidifier, but one of the easiest solutions it to just place a trimmed brick of oasis foam in the small plastic tray that many of them come with.

Igloodors - Igloodors are also commonly referred to as "Coolerdors."
There are only two minor drawbacks to using these for long term cigar storage:
1) They are more susceptible to becoming over humidified since their plastic walls do not help to buffer the relative humidity so it is extra important to not overcharge your humidifier. Because of the risk of higher moisture levels you need to be on the alert for the possibility of mold forming.
2) They can not breathe as a traditional humidor will. Therefore, they will trap the ammonia and off gases generated by your cigars aging within them. To alleviate this problem you should open them at least once a month to allow for an exchange of fresh air.
I have used both of these alternatives for many years to no detriment. However, most aficionados will eventually purchase a humidor as there is a sense of great satisfaction when selecting a fine cigar to smoke from a well-crafted humidor rather than a plastic container. It only seems fitting that a premium cigar should be kept in a beautiful humidor.

You can make a homemade humidifier with the following materials
WET Oasis Foam - this is the type used for live floral arrangements, do not use DRY Oasis foam, it will not work. WET Oasis foam is available at all florist and most craft stores.
Propylene Glycol (PG) - Chemical available from your pharmacist's counter for roughly $7 a pint. This is the "secret ingredient" in all regulating agents such as Credo's Special Care solution.
Distilled Water - available at most grocery stores
Any Container - travel soap dish, film tube, etc.
For example, take a travel soap dish and drill numerous holes to allow substantial airflow throw the walls of the container. Cut the foam small enough to fit loosely into the container - it must be small enough to allow for adequate air circulation around its surface. Mix a 50/50 solution of PG and distilled water, and moisten your oasis foam with the mixture. Remember MOISTEN... do not saturate!!! And voila' a homemade "Credo" and for much less than those commercially sold... amazing huh? Also keep in mind it takes a couple of days for the humidifier itself to stabilize before it can begin to regulate your humidor properly.
A couple final items regarding humidifiers that you should keep in mind:
The size/number of humidifiers necessary depends on a number of things: ambient climate, your humidor's construction, number of times a day it is opened, how many cigars are in it, etc. But a good rule of thumb is:
A humidifier can never be too large, bigger is better with an emphasis towards more surface area rather than thickness.
Always remember to never overcharge them with distilled water.
Always utilize distilled water. It will prevent clogging and is far less likely to cause molding in your humidor. I am always amazed by people who try to say their tap water is "this and that" filtered ­ don't be so cheap. You are storing cigars worth typically hundreds of dollars and distilled water costs $0.99 a gallon at the grocery store.
All passive humidifiers will require a couple of days to settle in after being initially charged. Do not expect your humidor to be at 70% RH in just a few hours.
And most importantly, all humidifiers are going to regulate within a range of the desired RH ­ do not wig out over being a few percentage points off.
avatar
Admin
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 1445
Reputation : 0
Points : 6984
Registration date : 2008-08-31

http://swamp-ass.forumotion.net

Back to top Go down

Re: The Coolerdor

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 03, 2011 10:09 pm

Cigar Storage Alternatives
by R.W. DeVries
For the beginning smoker, or those of us saving up for their dream: the ultimate 500-cigar mahogany humidor; there is a low-cost method of keeping our precious cigar investments in top smoking condition. This involves some leg work as well as some trial and error experimentation, but for under $20, anyone can build themselves a simple and effective cigar storage container.
This storage alternative has come to be known as a "tupperdore" or "rubberdore". I cannot take credit for discovering this ingenious storage method, however, I have refined it somewhat after more than 18 months of successful implementation. Originally I learned about the basic concept in the various online computer services and Internet cigar circles such as: bulletin boards, newsgroups and World Wide Web sites. Here's a step-by-step description of the process.

1. Begin by obtaining a plastic storage container with a lid that snaps closed (like the kind used to put clothes or shoes in for storage under a bed.) These are widely available at discount retail superstores or even drug stores and are made by a variety of manufacturers. A four to five quart size is large enough to accommodate several boxes of individual smokes. I've got a clear four quart container at home which cost around $6.

2. Visit a local florist and obtain a block of the green floral foam that florists stick cut flowers into. A cube block the dimensions of 4"x4"x4" should be plenty big to work with. Do not use the flaky loose stuff - the solid block is what you require. Most florists are willing to part with a scrap block for free, but will also sell you a chunk for less than $1 if a sufficient sized single scrap piece is not available. This will serve as your all-important humidification device.

3. Obtain a small dish which will hold your foam block. Any small plastic, waterproof container will do. I'm using an old 3" deep by 4" diameter margarine tub. Incremental cost is zero.

4. Purchase a gallon of distilled water (unless you can find smaller sizes.) Cost, about $2.

5. Now, the most important part, and a widely held cigar industry secret... visit or call a local pharmacy and order a pint of a clear, liquid chemical compound called "propylene glycol", or "PG". PG is a preservative typically used in various forms in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. A pint should run you around $4-$6, I obtained a bottle recently from a major drug store chain pharmacy near my office. I went up to the pharmacy counter, told the pharmacist that I wanted to order a pint of propylene glycol; they ordered it, and I had it the next business day. PG is typically not kept in stock so the pharmacy might have to order a pint bottle for you.

The purpose of this wonder fluid is that it actually absorbs excess moisture from the air. As you probably know, the rule of thumb regarding proper humidity and temperature for storage of premium smokes is 70 degrees and 70% relative humidity. PG's chemical properties allow a reasonably sized enclosed container to maintain about 70% relative humidity! The danger points are letting the temperature rise above 80 or allowing relative humidity to surpass the 80% point. If this occurs, there is a chance that microscopic, dormant tobacco beetle eggs inherently found on many tobacco leafs might hatch and wreak havoc on your entire cigar stash.

Humidification units sold with commercial humidors all use a PG mixture in their units, and sell their "special humidor recharging fluid" for upwards of $20 for a squeeze bottle the size of a bottle of eye drops. Surprise, surprise - the recharging fluid is nothing more than propylene glycol and distilled water. You've now spent, at most, around $17.

6. Now you are ready to construct your storage unit. Cut the floral foam with a knife to snugly fit your small plastic dish while the foam is dry. Mix 1/2 cup of PG and 1/2 cup of distilled water together, stir with a spoon. Place the foam into the liquid mixture and allow it to soak up as much of the mix as it can. You may need to turn the block over several times in order to let it get completely saturated. Put your soaked block into the small dish, put the dish into the storage container and voila - "tupperdore"!

The distilled water will evaporate as needed, but the PG will work to soak up excess humidity to maintain the 70% level. During winter months, you'll probably want to add an extra 1/4 cup of distilled water every 4 weeks or so due to the lack of natural humidity in the atmosphere. Conversely, in the summer when humidity levels get higher, an extra tablespoon of PG should help keep humidity in check. Keep in mind that unlike water, PG does not evaporate and excess PG may sap the container of the necessary humidity. I've been replacing my foam block every six months or so just to keep things fresh.

7. Additional hints and tips. Take some Spanish cedar from the lining, separator sheets, or blocks in cigar boxes and put these into your container with your smokes. This will give your cigars that "right out of the box" scent, assist the aging process, and help stabilize the humidity level since the wood is somewhat porous. Ask your local tobacconist for some cedar sheets or blocks - they should be more than willing to provide some from the empties they'll have lying around. Give your container two weeks or so to stabilize allowing the cigars, wood and foam block to work together. Whether or not to leave the cellophane wrappers on cigars is a matter of preference. Many cigars do not even come in wrapped in cellophane and their manufacturers argue that this practice allows the cigars to age better and mingle their flavours more effectively.

Cellophane is somewhat porous and keeps moisture in the cigar, but it also helps protect the delicate wrapper leaf surrounding your cigars from errant handling. On the other hand, different cigars have different tastes, blends and characteristics. Storing a variety of cigars out of their cellophane wrappers over an extended period of time might intermingle these characteristics, and you might or might not want this to occur. As with many aspects of cigar smoking, the choice is up to the individual. Try both ways and see what best works for you. I store mine out of the cellophane, but keep the cellophane for transporting the cigars to help diminish the chance of damage.

Judge the state of cigars by sight, feel and sound. Give your cigar a slight squeeze and roll it between your fingers and thumb. If it is mushy, chances are you have too much moisture in your container. If this is the case, cut your block in half (removing one of the halves) and give the container 2 weeks to stabilize again. Smokes can begin to split due to over-humidification (the tobacco expands, hence ripping the delicate wrapper leaf) or by humidifying a dried-out cigar too quickly.

If the cigar is too dry you'll hear a crunching sound. Unraveling tobacco wrappers are often caused by not enough moisture in the container (the tobacco shrinks and the wrapper seal is broken.) Add some distilled water to your humidification device or obtain a larger block of foam. I told you there would be some experimentation involved!

If you have an overly dry cigar, put it in a cellophane wrapper, fold the open end over, and let it sit in your humidor for a total of four to six months. After the first two or three months, open the end of the cellophane wrapper. After one or two months more, take the cellophane off. This should help to gradually return moisture to the cigar. Beware that sometimes essential oils are evaporated in very dry cigars, thus affecting the flavour adversely.

To more closely monitor the temperature and humidity levels in your container, there are a number of hygrometers on the market which will help you accomplish this. I purchased a digital model from a national electronics retail chain store (about $25) which displays the temperature and relative humidity level with minimum and maximum memory. It simply sets on top of my cigars in the "tuperdore". This is purely optional but serves as a good check.

Instead of a plastic storage container, I know of some people who have effectively used 48-quart camping coolers and larger blocks of floral foam to keep many boxes of smokes in great smoking condition (in the original boxes!) Now that you've got a handle on the humidity issue, keep your new storage box in a basement or closet where the temperature is relatively constant. Regular indoor room temperature of 65-75 degrees is fine. That's it!

There are literally hundreds of folks in the Internet cigar community utilizing this storage method with great success. Sure, it doesn't have the allure of a nice wooden humidor sitting on your mantle or desk, but it sure beats smoking a dried out Honduran corona you've had sitting in a drawer for two weeks. And what the heck - for under $20 (sans hygrometer), who can argue? In fact, my wife asked me if I wanted a wood humidor for Christmas, I told her to order me $250 worth of Dominican robustos instead!
avatar
Admin
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 1445
Reputation : 0
Points : 6984
Registration date : 2008-08-31

http://swamp-ass.forumotion.net

Back to top Go down

Re: The Coolerdor

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 03, 2011 10:10 pm

Proper Way to Hydrate a Cigar Humidor

There are smooth cigars from a variety of manufacturers from Havana to Honduras. However, if a cigar is not properly stored, it won't stay smooth for long. Keeping cigars properly hydrated is the key to making sure that they taste good no matter how long they are stored.

Cigars Get Better With Age
Cigar tobacco reaches its fullest flavor after it has aged for at least six months. Normally, cigars purchased from retailers are already aged. Cigars purchased on the Internet often need more aging in a humidor in order to reach their fullest flavor. A humidor does not have to be elaborate, but it does need to have the right humidity and temperature levels.

Humidity and Temperature
For the best cigar storage, keep the humidity level and temperature of the humidor the same. Generally, 70 percent humidity and a temperature of 70 degrees F is ideal for cigar storage. Filling the humidifier with a solution of 50 percent distilled water and 50 percent propylene glycol will ensure proper humidity levels. Distilled water should only be used for a humidor because it does not have any odor and will not affect the flavor of your cigars.

Wood Is Best for Storage
Although cigars can be stored in almost anything, wood humidors are the best bet for a proper moisture balance. Mahogany and cedar absorb and give off moisture better than other materials. It is good to wipe the inside of a wood humidor with a cloth dampened with distilled water. This will help get a humidor to the proper humidity level more quickly. It is important, though, not to get the wood too wet, or it can cause it to warp and can cause the humidor to not hold the proper humidity level. Another good way to keep a humidor properly hydrated is to keep a glass of distilled water inside it. Some people also put a sponge soaked in distilled water inside humidor. Either option will work for properly hydrating a humidor.

Alternative Storage Options
Wooden humidors are expensive and can cost upward of $250. Less expensive options include plastic containers, coolers, metal bins and glass containers. When using these alternatives, it is best to keep cigars in their plastic wrappers. It is also a good idea to line the container with paper to keep the cigars as moist as possible.



Read more: Proper Way to Hydrate a Cigar Humidor | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/way_5631621_proper-way-hydrate-cigar-humidor.html#ixzz1U1BqvzI3
avatar
Admin
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 1445
Reputation : 0
Points : 6984
Registration date : 2008-08-31

http://swamp-ass.forumotion.net

Back to top Go down

Re: The Coolerdor

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum